Echo  is a work that acts as a disobedient mirror and an unreliable portrait. Through simple programming and a microprocessor embedded in the work,  Echo  alternates between being a reflective mirrored surface in which viewers can locate themselves, to a beaming light portal, where all reflection is lost. The circle of light that emanates from the work is a reductive ‘portrait’ that comments on the likenesses and connections between the human and the humanoid and seeing and being seen.   Echo  continues my interest in pushing at the boundaries of portraiture and exploring the evolution of the notions of ‘being’ and ‘presence’ as influenced by evolving technological heterotopias. Portraiture, as a mode of art making, is reflective of the changing notion of self through time, and  Echo  as a portrait addresses this in the age of the almost-ubiquitous selfie and the ever-increasing influence of online and virtual worlds.
       
     
YHamilton_Echo_bothviews.jpg
       
     
YHamilton_Echo_unlit_small.jpg
       
     
  Echo  is a work that acts as a disobedient mirror and an unreliable portrait. Through simple programming and a microprocessor embedded in the work,  Echo  alternates between being a reflective mirrored surface in which viewers can locate themselves, to a beaming light portal, where all reflection is lost. The circle of light that emanates from the work is a reductive ‘portrait’ that comments on the likenesses and connections between the human and the humanoid and seeing and being seen.   Echo  continues my interest in pushing at the boundaries of portraiture and exploring the evolution of the notions of ‘being’ and ‘presence’ as influenced by evolving technological heterotopias. Portraiture, as a mode of art making, is reflective of the changing notion of self through time, and  Echo  as a portrait addresses this in the age of the almost-ubiquitous selfie and the ever-increasing influence of online and virtual worlds.
       
     

Echo is a work that acts as a disobedient mirror and an unreliable portrait. Through simple programming and a microprocessor embedded in the work, Echo alternates between being a reflective mirrored surface in which viewers can locate themselves, to a beaming light portal, where all reflection is lost. The circle of light that emanates from the work is a reductive ‘portrait’ that comments on the likenesses and connections between the human and the humanoid and seeing and being seen.

Echo continues my interest in pushing at the boundaries of portraiture and exploring the evolution of the notions of ‘being’ and ‘presence’ as influenced by evolving technological heterotopias. Portraiture, as a mode of art making, is reflective of the changing notion of self through time, and Echo as a portrait addresses this in the age of the almost-ubiquitous selfie and the ever-increasing influence of online and virtual worlds.

YHamilton_Echo_bothviews.jpg
       
     
YHamilton_Echo_unlit_small.jpg